Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN)

 

Naltrexone was developed over 30 years ago to assist patients in overcoming drug addiction. By blocking the opioid receptor, the addiction potential of the addictive drug is reduced. It was subsequently determined that naltrexone also inhibits two key substances: beta-endorphin and metenkephalin. By inhibiting these two substances, the immune system is stimulated in a beneficial way.

Research on Low Dose Naltrexone

By using much lower doses than the ones required for its anti-addictive properties, naltrexone still possesses its immune stimulating properties. Low dose naltrexone, or LDN, involves the use of very low doses – on the order of 90% less – to achieve this immune system benefit.

LDN and Cancer

From an anti-cancer perspective, the benefit of low dose naltrexone seems to be an increase in the number of natural killer cells as well as their activity. Natural killer cells are important components of the immune system response, and are often deficient in cancer patients.

We feel that LDN has a lot of potential. It is typically taken at bedtime, as the immune system is especially active when we are sleeping. LDN must be compounded by a compounding pharmacy, but is inexpensive. It also seems to be very safe, with the only known side effect being vivid dreams.